Stars in the Forest, Not Just in the Sky: Geometric Stars in Plant Life.

 

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Scarlet Gilia (Ipomopsis aggregata)                                                                                                                                           Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman. All Rights Reserved

On Mount Lemmon, this is the first time I have seen a Scarlet Gilia.  It is so beautiful and unlike any flower that I have seen on the mountain.  This particular Scarlet Gilia was located on Turkey Run across from the community center.  After having the gift of encountering this, it encouraged me to share this out with the rest of you and your kids that Stars do exist in our world, not just in the sky.

For the little ones, stars just may be the easiest shape to learn because they are so special looking.  So why not begin with teaching them about things that are shaped like stars and point them out in the plant life and in food!

Up on Mount Lemmon, you have the beautiful Scarlet Gilia that is a five-pointed star.  The Cow Parsnips that bloom earlier in the summer look like spheres from far away, but look closer and you see little individual blossoms that are five-pointed stars!  As these bloom until October, Richardson’s geraniums on the mountain are these beautiful dark lavender blossoms that are also five pointed stars.  So go take a walk with the kids, or even for yourself and go find these beautiful stars during the day.

For other plants, it depends on where you live.  If you live in cooler areas, you may be able to look at the Lilies of the area and notice that their blooms are six-pointed stars.  Take the Hollyhock.  Look from within the bloom and you will see this beautiful green five-pointed star in the center.  In the desert, look for the Aloe Vera plants and look from above to see the star.

In food, we have stars that form on the top tomato plants (five-pointed stars), onion blossoms (six-pointed stars), and on the pomegranate fruit (six-pointed stars).  If you cut an apple horizontally, you get to see a star there as well (five pointed star)! So get the kids in the kitchen and explore which fruits and veggies have stars in them, or cut them into stars.

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Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) Ft.Ticonderoga, NY                                                                                  Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

 

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Aloe (Aloe vera) Tucson , AZ                                                                                                                 Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

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Cow parsnip (Heracleum lanatum) Mount Lemmon, AZ                                                           Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

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Tomato Plant Tucson, AZ   Corpus Christi Catholic Church Garden                                                                                                                         Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

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Richardson’s geranium (Geranium richardsonii) Mount Lemmon, AZ                                 Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

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Wood Lily (Lilium philadelphicum) Queensbury, NY                                                                   Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

 

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Pomegranate Fruit Tucson, AZ                                                                                                            Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

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Onion Blossom Queensbury, NY                                                                                                          Copyright 2016 Christina Grossman All Rights Reserved

 

Something To Think About:

To learn about shapes and to teach them to your young child, it really is not difficult.  You either need to look at the food you eat, or look at the plants outside.  Begin with teaching them about stars because they are everywhere you are,  up in the sky or growing out of the ground.  It just takes a moment to open your eyes and the eyes of your children so that you get to see and enjoy the beautiful geometries, the beautiful shapes that are already around you.  🙂

Learning about geometry at such an early stage in life gives them the opportunity to see it everywhere.  Once a child, or any person of any age, is able to see the geometry, it becomes more tangible when it is time to learn more about geometry in the classroom.  Geometry then becomes more relevant and more important to them to learn.

Have a wonderful time searching for the stars!

copyright 2016 Christina Grossman. All Rights Reserved

 

 

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